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Druzy: What are they? How are they made?
Posted by Dakota Stones to Articles
 

 
The term 'druzy' refers to natural, glittery crystals found on the surface of a host rock. This geological process occurs as water collects and evaporates on a stone's surface over a period of millions of years, leaving behind mineral build up that form tiny crystals. You will find druzy mainly near riverbeds and shorelines.

Druzy is most commonly found as quartz crystals on the surface of agate, but can be found on a variety of other host rocks as well.

Natural crystals other than quartz can also form druzy, either atop their own surface or upon other host rocks. These include (but are not limited to):  garnets, calcite, dolomite, malachite, chrysocolla, hematite, cobaltocalcite, pyrite, carnelain and uvarovite.

Druzy colors often vary from white to yellow, red, orange and brown. The attributes of druzy depend mainly on the type of stone that is underneath.

Metaphysically, druzy is thought to strengthen the body's healing potential, energize the spirit and help the wearer shine his/her light. It can also provide balance to offset feelings of fear and anxiety. 

There are essentially three major druzy manufacturing practices used today:


Natural - Druzy is formed naturally and cut to required needs and then sold without much or any brightening or coloring. Sometimes it may be washed in acid to get rid of rust deposits or any other coatings left on the druzy.

Electroforming - A thin, metallic bezel is formed around the druzy to make the beads and pendants.

Metallic Vapor Deposition - The stone is placed in a vacuum chamber where a metal, or metallic salt, is heated until it vaporizes. The thin vapor deposits on the surface of the gemstone giving it a new color (or dichroic effect) depending on the material vaporized.  Although this coating is considered to be permanent, thin-film surface coatings of any kind are susceptible to scratching, particularly along facet edges and junctions. Care should be taken to not allow any hard or abrasive objects to come in contact with coated gems.

*A very special Thank You to Ken Rogers for sharing his druzy expertise with us!


Druzy Earring Designs by Katie Hacker! Learn How!

Groovy Druzy Earring Designs & Instructions
by Katie Hacker


 
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