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Spring(Vernal) Equinox and its connection to stones.
Posted by Dakota Stones to Articles

The Spring or Vernal Equinox represents many things: rebirth, vitality, awakening and growth. A season of warmth and energy that blooms and connects us with a feeling of new beginnings. There are many stones that have a metaphysical connection with this changing of the season and what this change represents. Here a few of our favorites at Dakota Stones.

Peridot was believed to be a stone of springtime by ancients who considered it a gift from Mother Nature. It’s use as a gemstone dates back over four thousand years. It was considered sacred by Egyptians, early Christians and even Napoleon. It was considered by ancients as a gift from heaven and a sign of an abundant Spring. SHOP Peridot






Ruby Zoisite is a stone of fertility and rebirth. It is connected with physical and spiritual growth. Ruby Zoisite occurs naturally when small Ruby crystals become embedded within Zoisite. The Ruby inclusions in this stone are pink to reddish purple to dark purple, while the Zoisite is light to medium green. Shop Ruby Zoisite






Green Aventurine is connected to Persephone, the Greek Goddess of Spring. It has a strong connection to the earth and is a wonderful stone for gardening. It is known as the “Stone of Opportunity,” and thought to be the luckiest of all crystals. SHOP Green Aventurine

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The Story of Our North American Turquoise
Posted by Dakota Stones to Articles



We are proud to bring you these unique North American Turquoise stones. These stones were all mined and hand cut in North America. North American Turquoise is one of the few stones that never leaves North America from mine to finished bead. North American Turquoise carries the names of the mines from which they are produced. Sleeping Beauty, Kingman, Nevada 8, Campitos and Caballo Campitos are all names of turquoise mines, either in the U.S. or Mexico.




Sleeping Beauty Mine and Rough BlockSleeping Beauty Grade A Nugget


The Sleeping Beauty Mine is one of the most beloved mines in the Southwest. Located in Globe, Arizona. Sleeping Beauty was first mined for copper and gold. The city of Globe was founded in 1875 as a mining camp and today, mining and tourism are the driving force behind the town’s economy. The Sleeping Beauty mine supplied copper and turquoise for 40 years. However, turquoise production was closed in August 2012, when the owners decided to focus solely on copper mining. This mine gets its unique name from its shape. It appears to resemble a sleeping woman with her arms crossed or Princess Aurora “asleep” in her bed.




Kingman Mine


The Kingman Mine, which began mining in the 1880's, is still exploring and could continue to find new veins. The Campitos turquoise comes from a mine in Sonora, Mexico, that has been in production since the 1980's. There are a few other mines, some still producing, scattered across Arizona, Nevada and into Mexico.



Campitos Rough StoneCampitos Nugget


Once a mine is closed, you will only be able to find "old stock" collections of rough, cabs or slabs. Luckily, mine owners, miners and collectors have always kept a nice stash of turquoise from various mines and will usually part with it down the road for the right price.





We have located great sources of natural North American Turquoise. They know the ins and outs of the mining process and the stabilization of each stone. They stand behind their work as 100% genuine and untreated beyond their proprietary stabilization process. They do nothing to alter the color or appearance of the stone. Stabilization is standard in Turquoise beads today. The stones with both good natural hardness and color are very rare and are incredibly expensive. The Turquoise in mines today may not be hard enough and would break if drilled or shaped without stabilization.





Every stone has a unique story about where its from. The history of our Turquoise is a uniquely North American story. We are proud to offer these rare, limited stones and we are excited to explore how we can bring more beautiful stones with truly unique stories to you.



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Purple Turquoise is back! But it wasn't easy...
Posted by to Articles



Back after a four-year absence! We've had many requests to bring back Purple Turquoise, but had difficulties trying to source the Kingman metal matrix turquoise material needed to cut beads. Finally, we were able to acquire the material at the end of 2017. Unfortunately, our cutters had issues polishing the material, and we received far fewer strands than we hoped.





We work directly with stone cutters to ensure that our beads meet strict standards. That means good color and pattern, perfectly round rounds, consistent size in each bead, and laser-drilled holes. It also means that we know that all our beads are produced by fairly paid workers in safe conditions.



The look of the end product in this batch of Purple Turquoise was not the same quality we have seen in past batches. The strands are still beautiful, but the polish on the stone is more matte in appearance, and the metal matrix is not as bright as we would have liked.





We are a company of artisans, adventurers, and stone lovers, and we want to be proud of every bead we make. Dakota Stones believes every bead should be usable- no discards from half-drilled holes, surface cracks, or dimples. At the end of the day, we manufacture products that meet the quality standards of our in-house design and production teams, and the highest ethical standards in the industry.


Purple Turquoise Free Form PendantPurple Turquoise 8mm Round








Although we are a little disappointed with the final product, we still wanted to offer these strands of Purple Turquoise to you. There are limited quantities available of each style and, as always, we stand behind our products. If it doesn’t meet with your approval, send it back to us. We want you to love your Dakota Stones.





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Gobi Desert Beads
Posted by Dakota Stones to Articles

Much consideration goes into choosing the shapes and finishes that are cut from rough materials, usually to highlight the best natural aspects of the rough stone from which the beads are cut. Nearly all rough material is beautiful in its own way, but few are as beautiful as the finished beads, cabochons and pendants produced by expert human hands. 


But not all bead creation relies on human hands.

The beads that are gathered from the Gobi Desert have been produced by natural forces -- winds that blow the stones across the dunes, and the sands that carve and shape them over the course of centuries. The stones -- forms of agate and chalcedony -- are selected when they become bead-like and assembled into strands. These agates have a range of colors, but the stones that appear to be purple or blue are the rarest form of chalcedony. 


It has been very difficult over the years to buy Gobi Desert Beads, for several reasons. They are rare, highly valued, and the market is always strong in Mongolia, so few make it beyond the outskirts of the desert. When Dakota Stones can get them, as we did on our recent visit to China, we snap them up and bring them back. 



The Gobi Desert Beads we're now offering are available at two price points -- some have been tumbled into familiar, oval shapes, and some are still fairly rough, perhaps needing a few more decades in the blowing sands to become perfectly round. We offer them in the finished strands, just as we purchased them. All are very rare, however, and available only as long as they last.

                               SHOP ALL Gobi Desert Agate
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Mining the Facts: Beryl
Posted by Dakota Stones to Articles

A relatively rare silicate mineral found in igneous and metamorphic rocks around the world, Beryl is generally clear, while its variations in color are better known by other names: Emerald (green, due to traces of chromium or vanadium), Heliodor (yellow, due to traces of iron), Aquamarine (blue, due to traces of iron), Morganite (pink, due to traces of manganese), Golden Beryl and Red Beryl. Our Beryl strands include a number of examples of the varieties, including Aquamarine and Morganite.



Used exclusively as a gemstone until the 1920s, some common beryl is processed to recover beryllium, a rare element used in a number of industries. Cheaper sources have been discovered, but beryl mining byproduct is still sometimes used.



Beryl remains a relatively rare mineral because beryllium rarely occurs in large enough quantities to produce minerals.



Beryl once had another significant use: When the first eyeglasses were constructed in 13th century Italy, the lenses were made of beryl, as glass could not be made clear enough. And while rare, Beryl can be found in massive amounts -- one crystal found in Albany, Maine measured nearly 18 by 4 feet, and weighed approximately 40,000 pounds, but even that one pales in comparison to the crystal found in Madagascar in 1999, which measured 59 by 11 feet and weighed 840,000 pounds.

Our Beryl is available in 6, 8 & 10mm rounds!



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TUCSON 2019
Posted by Dakota Stones to Articles

Since we ALL can't go down to the Tucson Gem shows this year (sniff, sniff) we are bringing you some highlights. Here are some of our most recent arrivals that we saved out just for you!



Cat’s Eye is a quartz stone that appears in a range of colors including white, gray, green, yellow and brown. The fibrous asbestos inclusions in the stone give it the flash that inspired its name. It is a form of Chrysoberyl, the third to hardest common natural gemstone, with a Mohs Hardness of 8.5, between Topaz (8) and Corundum (9).

Metaphysical Attributes:
Healing, Prosperity, Happiness






With the possible exception of the horizon meeting the bright blue sky on a perfect summer day, or a sandy beach blending into a tropical bay, there may not be a beautiful blue-and-brown combination than that of Terra Agate. The rounds even resemble little Earths, the brown spaces creating new continents aside the unfamiliar oceans. A form of chalcedony made of quartz, Terra Agate contains the best of nature in a variety of small shapes.






Red Tiger Eye is actually Brown Tiger Eye which has been heat treated to bring out the red color. This macrocrystalline Quartz stone has chatoyant layers that create a flash which seems to emanate from within the stone as they catch the light. Tiger Eye has been revered and feared throughout history as an all-seeing, all-knowing eye, as well as a stone of prosperity, protection and good fortune.

Metaphysical Attributes:
Prosperity, Protection

Chakra:
Root, Sacral, Heart






Chrysocolla, a hydrous copper silicate, is often mistaken for turquoise due to its rich blues and blue to greens. It often also occurs with colors of rust, copper, black, white and reddish brown in speckles, veins and brecciated patterns. It is a very soft stone typically found near copper deposits. Chrysocolla was first described by Theosphrastus, a Greek philosopher and botanist who also named the stone, in 315 BCE.

Metaphysical Attributes:
Prosperity, Calming, Empowerment

Chakra:
Throat






Sunstone, a variety of Feldspar, is aptly named for its shades of gold, orange, red and brown, as well as its iridescent sparkle. As the stone catches the light, inclusions of Goethite or Hematite refract the light between the layers of the crystal, producing the effect of the stone seeming to shine from within.

Metaphysical Attributes:
Empowerment

Chakra:
Root, Sacral

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Muonionalusta Meteorites
Posted by Dakota Stones to Articles

* Please note: We are SOLD OUT of all muonionalusta meteorite strands and bead sets. We hope to get more strands in soon and will let you know as soon as we do! 

The meteorite was first discovered in Sweden, nearly 100 miles north of the Arctic Circle, in 1906 by two children who stumbled over a metal object stuck in the ground. Later determined to be an iron meteorite, it was thought to have fallen approximately 800,000 years ago.



A meteorite is a portion of a meteoroid or asteroid that survives its passage through the atmosphere and hits the ground without being destroyed.



These rare Muonionalusta (pronounced /MOO-oh-ne-oh-nah-loo-stah/) meteorite impacted the Earth, shattering into many pieces, only 40 of which are known today. Smaller pieces of this meteorite have been found in the area, spread by the impact with the earth or moved through glacial changes. Since the meteorite collided with Earth it has experienced four ice ages!

When cut, the meteorite's inner structure becomes visible. Lines and layers, known as the Widmanstätten pattern, are an interweaving of kamacite (an alloy of iron and nickel) and taenite (a mineral found naturally in iron meteorites, also an alloy of iron and nickel) bands. This patterning is visible on our meteorite beads but on a smaller scale, of course.

Because of the high iron content these beads are surprisingly heavy -- much the way a meteorite is far heavier than a normal rock of the same size. Customers should also note that our meteorite beads are untreated and, because of their high iron content, they are subject to rust and oxidation over time. Needless to say, we have very limited stock of these meteorites!



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PANTONE 2019 COLOR SWATCHES
Posted by Dakota Stones to Articles

We've put together some of the PANTONE 2019 'Living Coral' color swatches and matched them with Dakota Stones!

These are just suggestions, and we encourage you to make up your own, as there are endless combinations you can make with this vibrant coral color for 2019.














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Neutral Colors: The Perfect Base for Your Design
Posted by Dakota Stones to Articles

The best thing about neutral (or natural) colors is they can be a consistent backdrop for ever-changing trends -- you can offset pretty much any color with a good base. This means that whatever colors are brought to the table, whatever year, you can seamlessly blend with a solid, classic neutral that will only serve to support your design.

Here, I mixed neutrals like our new dendritic opal, natural druzy & black jade with a gorgeous pop of deep purple lepidolite.






I have also found that stones can be very forgiving in terms of color matching. Natural colored stones can blend in almost any direction -- from red to yellow to blue and green. Here is an example of how to mix and match off-white, such as our new mother of pearl, with pops of orange, teal and gray/beige.






This theory also works in reverse, you can use a neutral shade like river stone as the standout color by blending in darker stones like black silver leaf and picasso jaspers.




Happy Stranding!
Meredith @ Dakota Stones


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Cut for the Japanese Market: RARE Black Eye Agate
Posted by Dakota Stones to Articles

Crafted from the highest-grade Sardonyx, rare Black Eye Agate beads take a highly skilled lapidary to cut and make consistent.

Due to tight banding in rough sardonyx, these stones are especially beautiful with concentric circles that closely resemble an eye. Our specific strands were cut for the Japanese market -- where precision and balance are oftentimes requirements -- and only top-grade materials and exacting lapidary is accepted.

Dakota Stones is fortunate to be partnered with a cutter that produces mainly for the Japanese market. We are thrilled whenever we get the opportunity to acquire any available overruns or rejected strands because, in any other market, even their seconds still carry a AAA grade strand rating.




Look for more of these Japanese cut strands in limited quantities offered at Dakota Stones. Be mindful that buying strands cut from the very top 1% of rough material and crafted by the leading lapidary artists in Asia can carry a price tag equal to the unique pieces of art they truly are.
These might be best as a gift for your personal collection.



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 Spring(Vernal) Equinox and its connection to stones.
 New dZi style beads! What are they exactly?
 The Story of Our North American Turquoise
 Purple Turquoise is back! But it wasn't easy...
 Gobi Desert Beads
 Mining the Facts: Beryl
 TUCSON 2019
 Muonionalusta Meteorites
 PANTONE 2019 COLOR SWATCHES
 Neutral Colors: The Perfect Base for Your Design
 Cut for the Japanese Market: RARE Black Eye Agate
 The Only Branded Line of Gemstone Beads
 Mining the Facts: Blue Chalcedony
 Rare Find: Purple Fluorite & Green Fluorite Quartz
 From Diamond to Rough: A Guide to Stone Cuts
 Mining the Facts: Stones from Madagascar
 Manufacturing Large Hole Beads
 Large Hole & Leather Bracelet
 Spooky Gemstone Week!
 Mining the Facts: North American Turquoise Q & A
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